Semicolons

Image

Classic job interview advice:  if asked to lunch, never order the spaghetti. It’s almost impossible to eat it with aplomb. Semicolons are a spaghetti dish.

A critical eye can overlook a comma mistake or two without blinking, but a semicolon mistake might as well be red sauce on a white shirt front. 

Semicolons are infrequently needed, which means people don’t get enough practice using them; however, there are three good reasons for using one.

Rarely used:  Semicolons join two independent clauses without using a conjunction. It looks like this:

Florence Green, of King’s Lynn, England, died two weeks short of her 111th birthday; she was the last known surviving service member of WWI.

Seldom is a sentence structured this way. It’s used when a writer is trying to show that two ideas together say something more important than either alone. In the example of Ms. Green’s death, the first clause records the end of one life. The second clause puts her death into context with all the other deaths of WWI service members. Two different senses of finality, then, are united in one sentence.

Note: When writers accidentally substitute a comma for this semicolon, it creates a comma splice. Semicolons are used sparingly, so they should not be the first fix of a comma splice. Instead, fix them by either adding a conjunction after the comma or replacing the comma with a period.

Occasionally used:  Semicolons separate all the items in a list if one or more of the items uses a comma. It looks like this:

The final three WWI service members were Frank Buckles, a U. S. Army ambulance driver in France; Claude Choules, a Royal Navy veteran and the war’s last known combatant; and Florence Green, who enlisted in the Women’s Royal Air Force just months before the war ended.

Not every item in the list has to have a comma. Semicolons are used if even one of the items has an internal comma. It looks like this:

The final three WWI service members were a U. S. Army ambulance driver named Frank Buckles; a Royal Navy veteran named Claude Choules, who was the war’s last known combatant; and Florence Green.

Note:  If this is a rule you fear you won’t remember, then use short lists with commas and save the details for a separate sentence on each of your items:

The final three WWI service members were a U. S. Army ambulance driver named Frank Buckles, a Royal Navy veteran named Claude Choules, and Florence Green.

Most often used:  Semicolons separate an independent clause from one that begins with a subordinating conjunction. It looks like this:

Marham Royal Air Force Base had planned to send a delegation to celebrate Ms. Green’s birthday; instead, they provided a bugler and a Union Jack for her funeral.

Note:  You can avoid the semicolon if you break the sentence into two parts with a period:

Marham Royal Air Force Base had planned to send a delegation to celebrate Ms. Green’s birthday. Instead, they provided a bugler and a Union Jack for her funeral.

A final note:  Be careful not to overuse semicolons. If you use more than one or two per page of essay, you risk burdening your reader with long, heavy sentences. Readers respond better to writing composed of varied sentence length and rhythm.

If you need help with commas, try reading this slide deck or this post. If sentence punctuation needs a review, try this.

4 comments

  1. Finally something I can understand. I remember trying to grasp the semicolon in high school, and that was an epic fail. Thank you!

    1. You replied to this almost before it was published!
      I’m glad to know it helped clear away the epic fail.

  2. Hmm, I shall have to bookmark this one. Semi-colons are not my friends – yet.

  3. Here’s to the birth of a long friendship, then!

Want to share your views?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 56 other followers